Uni-Logo
Sektionen
Sie sind hier: Startseite Forschung abstracts Bauhus J., van Winden, A. P. and A. B. Nicotra (2004): Above-ground interactions and productivity in mixed-species plantations of Acacia mearnsii and Eucalyptus globulus.
Artikelaktionen

Bauhus J., van Winden, A. P. and A. B. Nicotra (2004): Above-ground interactions and productivity in mixed-species plantations of Acacia mearnsii and Eucalyptus globulus.

Canadian Journal of Forest Research 34, 686-694.

This study investigated as to what extent the increased productivity in mixed-species plantations of Eucalyptus globulus and Acacia mearnsii, in comparison with pure stands of each species, might be explained by canopy stratification between species and changes in leaf characteristics of eucalypts. Investigations were carried out at a trial using the replacement series design, which consisted of the following combinations: 100%E, 75%E:25%A, 50%E:50%A, 25%E:75%A, and 100%A (E = eucalyptus, A = acacia, numbers represent the planted proportion of each species). At 9.5 years, stem volume and biomass were highest in 50%E:50%A treatments. Canopy stratification occurred in all mixtures with acacias in the lower and eucalypts in the upper canopy stratum. This and the increasing canopy light interception with increasing proportion of acacia in mixture indicated that A. mearnsii is substantially more shade-tolerant than E. globulus. Mid-canopy foliage of E. globulus in the 50%E:50%A mixture had higher foliage N but lower P concentrations and lower light-saturated net photosynthesis rates (Amax) than those in the 100%E treatment. In addition, similar relationships between eucalypt crown volume and stem biomass across treatments indicated that eucalypt crowns were not more efficient in mixture. Our study indicates that the productivity gains in these mixtures may be partially attributable to aboveground niche separation between species.

Benutzerspezifische Werkzeuge